Projects and Project Summaries from 2013

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Projects and Project Summaries from the 2013 Editing Institute

A Player and a Gentleman: The Diary of Harry Watkins, Nineteenth-Century American Actor
http://www.harrywatkinsdiary.org/

Short description:
A Player and a Gentleman: The Diary of Harry Watkins, Nineteenth-Century American Actor Amy E. Hughes and Naomi J. Stubbs are creating a critical edition (both in print and online) of the diary of nineteenth-century American actor Harry Watkins (1825-1894). Written from 1845-1860, it is the only known diary of its size and scope by an American actor during the decade prior to the Civil War, and provides a vivid account of nineteenth-century American life both on and off the stage.

Long Description:
Amy E. Hughes and Naomi J. Stubbs are creating a critical edition of the diary of American stage actor, manager, and playwright, Harry Watkins (1825-1894).  Despite his constant employment and collaborations with the most celebrated performers and producers of the day, including P. T. Barnum, Junius Brutus Booth, and Edwin Forrest, Watkins never became famous. Yet from 1845 to 1860, Watkins wrote religiously in his diary, detailing his daily activities, the roles he performed, the plays he saw, the people he met, the books he read, and his impressions of current events, leaving us with a vivid account of nineteenth-century American life both on and off the stage. This diary is the only known diary of its size and scope by an American actor during the decade prior to the Civil War. Hughes and Stubbs are making this fascinating diary available to researchers, students, and general readers in print and electronic format. They are creating a fully searchable, freely accessible online text, and a one volume printed annotated edition of selected entries, and their progress can be followed here: http://www.harrywatkinsdiary.org/

Notes from a Colored Girl: The Civil War Pocket Diaries of Emile Frances Davis

The diaries of Emile Frances Davis are being edited by Kaye Wise Whitehead (http://kayewisewhitehead.com/) to be published in one volume by the University of South Carolina Press in 2014.  The volume will include transcriptions, annotations, and historical narrative based upon three years worth of diaries written by Emilie Davis, 1863-1865. This is one of a handful of diaries that have been discovered that were written by a black woman.

The Works of George Santayana
http://iat.iupui.edu/santayana/

The volumes of The Works of George Santayana are unmodernized, critical editions of George Santayana’s published and unpublished writings. The goal of the editors is to produce texts that accurately represent Santayana’s final intentions regarding his works, and to record all evidence (in the textual apparatus listing variants and emendations) on which editorial decisions have been based.

The Works of George Santayana is published by The MIT Press (Cambridge, Massachusetts, and London, England) and is supported by the Indiana University School of Liberal Arts, Indianapolis and by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. The Works is projected to be 20 volumes consisting of at least 35 books.

Franz Boas Papers

The Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada has awarded $2.5 million to the University of Western Ontario over the next 7 years for a print and digital documentary edition of the Franz Boas Papers. Regna Darnell serves as General Editor, in partnership with the American Philosophical Society, where the papers are held, and the University of Nebraska Press. The Press has contracted for up to 25 volumes in both print and digital editions. The APS is digitizing the Boas professional papers (our source texts) with a revised finding aid and modest searchable metadata. Boas (1958-1942) was the  founder of modern American anthropology and a significant public  intellectual, taking stands on issues of cultural diversity, race,  war, the role of science in society, and many other issues that  crossed traditional academic boundaries and public audiences. His Native American fieldwork with the Canadian Eskimo and in British Columbia, especially among the Kwakiutl (now called Kwakwaka’wakw), remains foundational. We have established an Aboriginal Council from descendant communities to advise us on the handling of culturally sensitive (spiritual/religious) materials and digital repatriation of these documents to the communities of their origin. Our editorial team, including several Aboriginal scholars, comes primarily from Canada, the United States and Germany where Boas was born and educated.