Lyman H. Butterfield Award

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Since 1985, the Lyman H. Butterfield Award has been presented annually to an individual, project, or institution for recent contributions in the areas of documentary publication, teaching, and service. The award is granted in memoriam of Lyman Henry Butterfield, whose editing career included contributions to The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, the editing of the Adams Family Papers, and publishing The Letters of Benjamin Rush.

  • 2013 – The Papers of George C. Marshall Project
  • 2012 – Michael Stevens
  • 2011 – Beverly Wilson Palmer
  • 2010 – Helen Deese
  • 2009 – Gregg L. Lint
  • 2008 – Mary-Jo Kline
  • 2007 – Beth Luey
  • 2006 – Mary Hackett, Associate Editor of the Papers of James Madison, for her eighteen years of dedicated service and scholarly understanding in the editing and publishing of four volumes in the Secretary of State Series of the Madison Papers.
  • 2005 – no award made.
  • 2004 – Ken Bowling for the recent publication of three volumes of the Papers of the First Federal Congress. He has also served the field of scholarly editing through his work on Washington History, the Journal of the Early Republic and numerous ADE Committees.
  • 2003 – Ron Bosco, for his scholarly editing in the field of Colonial and Nineteenth-Century American Literature. He is also regarded as the leading editor of the works of Ralph Waldo Emerson.
  • 2002 – C. James Taylor, currently editor in chief of the Adams Papers, for his over twenty years at the Henry Laurens Papers which completed its final volume in 2002 and his five years as editor of Documentary Editing.
  • 2001 – Margot Backus for her twenty years of dedicated service to scholarly editors on behalf of the National Endowment for the Humanities.
  • 2000 – Elaine Forman Crane for her landmark edition of the Elizabeth Drinker diary, celebrated for intellectual depth, scholarly impact, and educational value. These volumes will stand the test of time and are already a testimony to the lasting legacy and impact of volumes well edited and a project well run.
  • 1999 – Mary Gallagher and Betty Nuxoll for the completion of the Robert Morris Papers.
  • 1998 – Joseph R. McElrath, Jr., of the Centennial Edition of the Writings of Frank Norris, in recognition of his achievements in textual and bibliographic studies and editing and his generosity in service to the profession.
  • 1997 – Massachusetts Historical Society, which, since 1792, has published historical documents in order to preserve and circulate them for the benefit of researchers. In 1990 the Society completed its edition in sixty-five volumes of the Journals of the Massachusetts House of Representatives, 1715-1779, and its ambitious plan, launched in 1954, to edit the Adams Papers has resulted in thirty-six volumes to date.
  • 1996 – Ann Gordon, editor of the Selected Papers of Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony at Rutgers University, for bringing a public profile to documentary editing, lending her expertise to events commemorating the anniversary of Women’s Suffrage.
  • 1995 – Joel Myerson, an English professor at the University of South Carolina and editor of Studies in the American Renaissance, was the first literary editor to win the award.
  • 1994 – Eugene R. Sheridan, for his work with the Letters of Delegates to Congress project and as senior associate editor of the Papers of Thomas Jefferson. He also edited Congress at Princeton: Being the Letters of Charles Thomson to Hannah Thomson, June-October 1783.
  • 1993 – Documentary History of the Ratification of the Constitution, for setting an example of excellence in editing.
  • 1992 – Marcus Garvey and Universal Negro Improvement Association Papers, edited by Robert A. Hill and Barbara J. Bair and published by the University of California Press.
  • 1991 – Yale University Press, in recognition of the Press’s long and distinguished record of publishing editions such as the Papers of Benjamin Franklin, the Papers of Benjamin Henry Latrobe, the Papers of Charles Willson Peale, and the Frederick Douglass Papers.
  • 1990 – David R. Chesnutt, editor of the Papers of Henry Laurens at the University of South Carolina, for his selfless service to the profession and to the ADE as president-elect.
  • 1989 – Sharon Ritenour Stevens, associate editor of the George C. Marshall Papers and editor of Documentary Editing from 1983 to 1989, guiding the expansion and development of the journal from its early incarnation as the ADE’s newsletter.
  • 1988 – Paul H. Smith, editor of the Letters of Delegates to Congress, 1774-1789, for his early devotion to the defining and funding of the Letters project and to the outstanding editorial leadership he provided.
  • 1987 – David W. Hirst, senior associate editor of The Papers of Woodrow Wilson, to which he has given over 30 years of service, helping to edit over 60 volumes.
  • 1986 – The Papers of George Washington, for its exemplary role in the publication of outstanding volumes in a timely fashion.
  • 1985 – Johns Hopkins University Press, in recognition of its commitment to the publication of documentary editions and for the support that the press has given to the six editions under its wing.